Colectomy – The Surgery Choice for Early Stages of Colon Cancer

By - Updated Nov 13, 2014

Colectomy is A Surgical Procedure That Treats Colon Cancer. This procedure is being performed by removing a portion (approximately 1/3 to 1/4 of it) of the colon (or the large intestine). The surgeon will remove the cancerous part of the colon. Aside from this, a few lymph nodes nearby will be removed. After the affected parts have been removed, the parts of the colon left behind will be attached to each other.

There Are Two Ways How Colectomy Is Done:

Colectomy
  • Traditional procedure.
  • Laparoscopic-assisted colectomy.

Traditional Procedure

This procedure is an open colectomy where a long incision is made on the abdomen so that the surgeon can have sufficient access to the colon.

Laparoscopic-assisted Colectomy

This is a newer form of colectomy. In this procedure, only small incisions are being done and a small camera will be inserted into an incision enabling the surgeon to see the area in need of work.

Reasons Why Take Colectomy

Colectomy treats colon cancer. It must be performed in its earlier stage. If the cancer progresses beyond the first stages, more extensive procedures of colectomy need to be performed then. Your doctor will recommend colectomy when he or she thinks that it is the best chance for his patient’s
survival.

What are the Risks of this Procedure ?

Generally, colectomy is regarded as a safe procedure that treats colon faster. There are minimal reports of complications. However, just like any other treatment, it has possible risks.

Here are some of them :

  • Internal bleeding
  • Hernia
  • Infection
  • Blockage of the Intestines
  • Scar tissue
  • Damage to nearby organs
  • Leak (when the remaining intestines are attached together)

Make sure that before you proceed with this procedure, you thoroughly discuss it with your doctor.

Preparation before the Procedure

  • When the surgery is performed, the bowels should be empty. The doctor will give the necessary instructions on the intake of food and liquid before the procedure. He or she might give the patient bowel preparations such as enemas and laxatives.
  • The doctor can also ask the patient to stop taking certain medications a week before the surgery.
  • Before the day of the procedure, the doctor may instruct the patient to only drink clear liquids. The latter will also be asked not to eat or drink 12 hours before the surgery.

Necessary Things before the Procedure

The patient may be required to stay in the hospital for 3 to 7 days. The doctor will give pain medication for 2 to 3 days. The patient will also receive nutrition through an IV drip. After a few days the patient may be able to eat solid food again. The doctor will have follow-up appointments to check the patient’s progress.

references
Author

Contributor : Colon Health Magazine Staff (Colon Health Magazine)

Colon Health Magazine is a free resource for families, providing everything from in-depth product reviews to expert advice. Our articles and guides are written by industry experts and backed by in-depth research and analysis.

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