Diseases that can Harm the Colon

By - Updated Oct 18, 2014

There are many diseases that affect the colon. One is Colitis. Colitis is a disease that is directly correlated to inflammation of the colon. Colitis is placed under the category of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Common symptoms include abdominal pain and bloating along with dehydration, diarrhea, and increased intestinal gas. Colitis is caused from a range of things including past radiation to the large bowel, lack of blood flow, acute infections or other inflammatory disorders. It can even come from different foods that are eaten on a daily basis, like soft drinks, spicy foods, and complex carbohydrates.

Harm the ColonAn abnormal pouch swelling inside the intestines characterizes diverticulitis. The presence alone of these random pouches is called diverticulosis. These pouches normally do not develop early in life, with most cases of diverticulitis coming in adults over the age of 40. They do develop because of high or abnormal pressure inside the colon. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom. It is most often felt in lower left side, but is not limited to that sole area. Fever, vomiting, the chills, and weight loss are all possible symptoms of diverticulitis. If it is just a small case, more often than not it can be simply treated with antibiotics. However, there a few cases where surgery is necessary. If there is a hole in the colon, if there is a buildup of pus surrounded by swelling, or if abnormal connections between different areas of the colon are present, surgery will be needed to remove it. Prevention of this disease can be taken care of with a high fiber diet and cutting out nuts and seeds.

Clostridium difficile is a complication that can cause a wide array of symptoms from something as minor as diarrhea to something as major as colon inflammation to the life threatening extent. Believe it or not, C-Diff can come about from taking antibiotics. Mild cases of Clostridium difficile do not have the most glaring symptoms. They include watery diarrhea three plus times a day for two or more days as well as mild ab cramps or tenderness. C-Diff is known to inflame the colon or to create patches of tissue that will bleed or produce pus. Loss of appetite, nausea, fever as well as watery diarrhea 10 to 15 times a day along with severe cases of abdominal pain and cramping can signal a severe infection. C-Diff can essentially be found anywhere. It can be in water, dirt, and the air, along with human or animal feces. A few healthy people living in the world even naturally carry it. Taking antibiotics can sometimes kill off some of the helpful bacteria that are in the intestines that protect us from illness. Without these helpful bacteria, C-Diff can grow extensively where it creates toxins that attack the intestinal lining. This is how inflammation of the colon and other complications come about. As earlier mentioned, a different antibiotic can treat C-Diff.

Metronidazoleis often used for mild cases while Vancomycin is used for more severe cases. These stop C-Diff from growing and allow normal bacteria to be abundantly present again. Other precautions to protect oneself from C-Diff. Include washing of hands, household cleaning, and not using antibiotics if possible.

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Contributor : Colon Health Magazine Staff (Colon Health Magazine)

Colon Health Magazine is a free resource for families, providing everything from in-depth product reviews to expert advice. Our articles and guides are written by industry experts and backed by in-depth research and analysis.

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