Preventing Colon Cancer

By - Updated Oct 18, 2014

Colon cancer is a devastating disease that kills over 650,000 people each year across the globe, making it the third highest form of cancer and third leading cause of cancer related deaths. Colon cancer occurs when tumors or other growths are found in the colon, rectum, and appendix areas of the body in both men and women. Colon cancer is discovered through the use of a colonoscopy and is treated through surgery and chemotherapy. The symptoms of colon cancer include constipation, diarrhea, bleeding, fatigue, unexplained weight loss, jaundice, abdominal pain and much more. There has been a new study released that claims taking aspirin on a regular basis can help those at a high risk of developing colon cancer avoid it altogether.

New Prevention for Colon CancerThe study released included the monitoring of 1,071 people that have Lynch syndrome, which is a genetic condition that can boost the risk of developing colon cancer and a couple of other forms of cancer. Researchers feel that people who are at a higher risk for developing colon cancer can help to stave off the disease by taking a daily dose of aspirin. Aspirin can help to alleviate pain and migraines but if taken too often it can cause bleeding while also irritating the stomach and intestines. This study was recently released, in early September, and the sample size was less than 1,500 people so experts across the globe have yet to clearly define aspirin as the best way to prevent colon cancer.

Aside from taking aspirin on a daily basis, there are other methods to prevent the development of colon cancer not only in high risk patients but also patients at average or low risk levels of developing the disease. Doctors recommend that regular colon cancer screening begin at the age of 50 for those who are at a high risk for developing the disease. The American Cancer Society has released screening guidelines that include annual fecal occult blood testing, flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years, double contrast barium enema every five years, colonoscopy every 10 years, virtual colonoscopy every five years and stool DNA testing.

Doctors also recommend people who are at high risk of developing colon cancer to make lifestyle changes if they wish to prevent the development of the disease. Certain lifestyle changes include eating a variety of fruits, vegetables and whole grains; drink alcohol in moderation, if at all stop smoking immediately, exercise as many days out of the week as possible and maintain a healthy weight. Four other options for reducing the risk of colon cancer include aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs other than aspirin, Celecoxib and surgery to prevent cancer. Not all of these options are viable choices for those at high risk of developing colon cancer when it comes to preventing the development of the disease. If you are at a high risk for developing the disease, you should speak with your doctor for the best treatment options possible before making any life altering decisions involving your diet and exercise regimen and colon cleanse products.

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Contributor : Colon Health Magazine Staff (Colon Health Magazine)

Colon Health Magazine is a free resource for families, providing everything from in-depth product reviews to expert advice. Our articles and guides are written by industry experts and backed by in-depth research and analysis.

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